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VHF (HAM) or CB (Read 1427 times)
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VHF (HAM) or CB
06/21/11 at 08:34:05
 
I've got both radios available to me on a ride. The CB is an older 5w transmitter the VHF is only a 3w but I'm pretty sure it transmits on a bandwidth that goes further. Question, is there any one out there monitoring?  I know 9 on a CB is usually reserved for emergencies. Is there a channel in the valley that VHF would be monitored?
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Re: VHF (HAM) or CB
Reply #1 - 06/21/11 at 09:03:32
 
I know it the area of the Paiute trail the central dispatch office for the sheriff's office's, highway patrol, and EMS, monitor the 2 meter repeater on Monroe mtn but I cant remember the frequency. They also used to monitor CB channel 9 but since the move to the new system I don't know if they still do since CB has such a short range it was only useful of a few miles of hwy around Richfield.
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Re: VHF (HAM) or CB
Reply #2 - 06/21/11 at 10:18:15
 
Try Ham repeaters 146.640 w 100 pl and 146.860 w 100 pl on Monroe.  I checked in with my friend down there that programs all the UHP radios and he said these were the ones that work the best.  These ham repeaters cover hundreds of miles and in some cases are linked across states.  Someone listening can get law enforcement for you and most Hams will help you and stick with the call and assist you.
 
You are right, each frequency range has it plus and minuses.  I do search and rescue and I am a Ham and most of you know the radio gear that I carry.
 
CB is a joke especially if sun spot activity is bad.  When the skip is in you get all the mexicans running high power in Mexico so it never shuts up.  CB handheld radios are clunky!
 
FRS is great but its low power output sucks.  If you and your friends are not Hams then in my opinion GRMS is really the ticket, but you need a license.  
 
The General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) is a licensed land-mobile FM UHF radio service in the United States available for short-distance two-way communication. It is intended for use by an adult individual who possesses a valid GMRS license, as well as his or her immediate family members.[1] Immediate relatives of the GMRS system licensee are entitled to communicate among themselves for personal or business purposes, but employees of the licensee, who are not family members, are not covered by the same license.
 
GMRS radios are typically handheld portable devices much like Family Radio Service (FRS) radios, and share some frequencies with FRS. Mobile and base station-style radios are available as well, but these are normally commercial UHF radios as often used in the public service and commercial land mobile bands. These are legal for use in this service as long as they are GMRS type-approved. They are more expensive than the walkie talkies typically found in discount electronics stores, and are generally considered higher quality.
 
Any individual in the United States who is at least 18 years of age and not a representative of a foreign government may apply for a GMRS license by completing the application form (either on paper or through the FCC's Universal Licensing System) and paying the license fee (currently $85.00). No exam is required. A license for a GMRS system is usually issued for a 5-year term.[2] Prior to July 31, 1987, the FCC issued GMRS licenses to non-individuals (corporations, partnerships, government entities, etc). These licensees are grandfathered and may renew their existing licenses. No new GMRS licenses are being issued to non-individuals, nor may existing non-individual licensees make major modifications to their licenses.[3]
 
The license extends privileges of the primary licensee to include communications with the licensee's immediate family members, and authorizes immediate family members to use the licensee's station(s) to conduct the activities of the licensee. Additionally, the FCC rules allow GMRS licensees to communicate with other GMRS licensees. GMRS licensees are allowed to communicate with FRS users on those frequencies that are shared between the two services. The rules require each GMRS user family to have a license, rather than (as in the case of commercial and public safety land mobile license) authorizing a licensee's employees to use the same license.
 
The way I would do it is have a couple in your group get GRMS radios and license and put those individuals from and back in the group.  Then have everyone in the group with FRS radios and and GRMS go to one of the frequencies common to both FRS and GRMS and you should have pretty good coverage.  As far as contacting law enforcement on FRS or GRMS it is pretty much non-existent.
 
If you want more info PM me.
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Re: VHF (HAM) or CB
Reply #3 - 06/22/11 at 19:43:58
 
There's more? I still am looking for the power button Grin Smiley
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Re: VHF (HAM) or CB
Reply #4 - 06/23/11 at 08:09:47
 
You know us NERDY types...
 
I have been told I have radio inplants and that I do not miss anything that is going on.  I do not know about the inplant...but no I do not miss much.
 
If you think my ATV is bad you should see my truck and house.
 
Oh well...
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Re: VHF (HAM) or CB
Reply #5 - 06/23/11 at 21:34:13
 
Thanks guys. I'll pack the VHF, leave the cb in camp. I take it in case I NEED it.  
 
See ya' on the thails.  
 
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Re: VHF (HAM) or CB
Reply #6 - 08/14/11 at 11:23:09
 
Another wide coverage repeater to put in your radio's memory is the Horseshoe Mountain machine:  146.66 mHz, negative offset with 100Hz PL.  It is located at 10,300' on Skyline Drive above Ephraim.
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Re: VHF (HAM) or CB
Reply #7 - 08/14/11 at 11:39:46
 
SARrider is spot on!  My riding buddies and I have been using GMRS/FRS radios in the configuration SAR describes for several years.  I have a GMRS license running a 45 watt FCC type-approved radio with a 9dB gain antenna to communicate with a similarly licensed and equipped rider at the other end of our line.  We communicate with riders in between us on a shared FRS/GMRS channel at reduced legal power.  Being able to communicate while riding adds a new dimension of enjoyment to riding.  It's another good reason to always wear a helmet.
 
I would add to SARrider's post the recommendation to install a headset in your helmet.  Google "Helmet headset" or similarly search eBay.  Cost about $30, including all the cables, connectors, mounting Velcro, and PTT switch -- all set to plug into your $25 Motorola Talkabout, or similar radio.   
 
Leave the CB for the truckers.  Useless on the trail.
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Re: VHF (HAM) or CB
Reply #8 - 08/14/11 at 12:04:07
 
I am on my second helmet bluetooth configuration and I will probably buy another next week.  I have a Chatterbox Blue tooth communications that allows the wife and I to communicate up to a few hundred feet apart and it blue tooths to my FRS/GRMS radio or Zumo GPS.  It is all wireless.  It works well.
 
Sena is coming out with a hub that allows you to communicate rider to passenger and have four items blue toothed or hardwired to the hub.  This means I can combine the Zumo, Cell phone, both the radios on the ATV and have it all wireless to our helmets.  Pretty cool!!
 
However, I have not found a bluetooth helmet setup yet the last more than 5-6 hours on a charge.
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Re: VHF (HAM) or CB
Reply #9 - 08/14/11 at 17:05:28
 
Quote from Ed on 08/14/11 at 11:39:46:
I would add to SARrider's post the recommendation to install a headset in your helmet.  Google "Helmet headset" or similarly search eBay.  Cost about $30, including all the cables, connectors, mounting Velcro, and PTT switch -- all set to plug into your $25 Motorola Talkabout, or similar radio.   

Leave the CB for the truckers.  Useless on the trail.

 
Great discussion guys, thanks.  On our last outing we started using helmet radios for the 5 of us in our family and we really love it.  Being able to communicate adds a whole new dimension to riding in a group.  We just use headsets that connect to cheap FRS/GMRS radios and toss the radios in our Camelback water packs (or backpacks).   Range is acceptable given the typical spread of our group.   I use Sanyo Eneloop AAA rechargeables which easily last all day.   I like these particular kind since they are low self-discharge so they're ready to go after sitting in a drawer (provided you charged them up after the last outing  Wink)
 
I use the Motocomm stuff which is a complete solution that includes mic and thin speakers for your helmet, PTT switch you can run down your sleeve and velcro around your index finger, and cable connection that is specific to the particular radio you want to use.   Alternately, you can mount the PTT switch on your handlebars, but I find it inconvenient to be wired to my machine.  Fully wired - not wireless, so taking your helmet off requires disconnection of one of the connectors.
 
http://www.motocomm.com/products.php?ItemID=3219&ProductCatID=163
 
You can find sellers on Ebay with this product.  The only downside is the volume doesn't get that loud.  It can be very hard to hear above 30-40mph due to wind noise.  However, that is probably more a function of the output capability of the Midland FRS/GMRS radios I use.  Haven't tried other radios to see if the helmet speakers can get louder.
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